Breaking the Chains in Indonesia: Daily Brief

Shackling people with mental health conditions in Indonesia; the threat of white supremacy in the US; UN staff partners unwelcome in US; civilians on Ukraine's front lines; discriminatory testosterone regulations in sport; forced labor and slavery worldwide; Hungary responds absurdly to Europe's criticism; and Saudi Arabia cracks down on... economists? 

The Indonesian government has taken important steps to end the practice of shackling people with mental health conditions, but many people remain locked up in institutions instead of being able to live in the community.

Why are US intelligence and law enforcement agencies relatively silent about white supremacist movements?

The world has largely forgotten the conflict in eastern Ukraine. The people living there don't have that luxury. 

Three United Nations human rights experts have written a joint letter to the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) raising concerns about new regulations that discriminate against women with intersex variations and bar certain athletes from competition.

Over the last five years leading multinational companies have become far more willing to talk publicly about the risks and challenges of forced labor and modern slavery in their supply chains. This is a welcome development, but some 25 million people are still being coerced to work around the world...

A few weeks ago, the European Parliament voted by a huge majority to censure Hungary for its authoritarian slide. The government in Budapest has not been taking it well...

Saudi Arabia is now going after economists who don't agree with the government's economic plans...